About Us

Quinta Chiappetta began operation in the early 1980s, in Kenosha, Wisconsin. We started with four Quarter horses and Appaloosas and did a little breeding. Our daughter, Laura, was attending Arizona State University, in Phoenix, at that time. That was when I discovered Paso Finos.

During a visit, with Laura, I attended a horse show. The featured breed was the Arabian (since it was Arizona). But, at the lunch break, they demonstrated horses I had never seen or heard of before – Peruvian Pasos. When they offered a “test ride” to anyone in the audience, of course I got in line. My husband, Chips, was ready to leave. So, naturally, I did what any horse person would do…I told him to leave and pick me up later!group photo from Nationals 2008

The Paso’s smooth ride was really impressive. I had never seen anything move like the Peruvian Paso did. I remembered, as a child, an elderly man telling me that what I needed was a “single-footer.”  At the time, I had no idea what a single-footer was and was too shy to ask. (Those who know Kay can’t fathom that!) But, after riding the Paso, it suddenly dawned on me that “single-footer” was a good description of this horse.

Back home, I looked for Peruvians but couldn’t find any. However I did find horses called American Paso Finos. They were just as smooth to ride, without the funny movement in the front.  Since I was used to “normal” front-action, in the horses I owned, the American Paso Fino seemed to be the perfect horse for me. Besides, I thought that if I had a couple smooth-riding horses, my husband might enjoy riding. It took me nearly a year to sell our horses and then find a couple Paso Finos. My husband was sure I was trying to kill him by trail riding! But, he’s great as the farm manager, keeping fences intact and picking up loads of hay while supervising the rest of us.

We enjoyed our trail Pasos so much that we started attending Paso Fino shows. The shows were interesting and exciting and it was then that our focus changed to horses that could compete. Bud and Margie Magnus and Rufo Figueroa, who trained for them, in Wisconsin, helped educate us about Show Pasos.

Aerial photo of QCIn 1987, our family moved to Shelbyville, Kentucky. The more Southern climate is much better for an outside lifestyle, and is also more centrally located to shows. Those of you who know us are familiar with our daughter, Catherine, and our granddaughter, Ashlee. They both love the show ring and we enjoy cheering for them, our friends and clients.

Generally, we have 35 to 65 horses at Quinta Chiappetta, depending on the time of year. We welcome your visit! The Contact Us page has a map to Quinta Chiappetta. Please give us a call to let us know you’re coming. 502-633-0541 or 502-741-8211 (cell)